DepEd to disallow “Jejemon fashion" in school

June 9, 2010 12:36 pm 

MANILA, June 8 — Despite the existing “no uniform” policy the Department of Education (DepEd) on Tuesday said it will not tolerate “jejemon” fashion among school children adding that they should still wear the proper school attire.

Education Secretary Mona Valisno said, “we want school children to wear whatever decent clothes and footwear are available to them as long as its not expensive.”

The no-uniform rule seeks to allow pupils who cannot afford to buy uniforms to attend school. It is part of DepEd’s effort, along with the “no collection” policy, to ensure that all school age children are enrolled in schools.

Earlier, teacher-members of the Teachers Dignity Coalition (TDC) pressed DepEd for clarification on what to consider as proper attire of school children adding that this might cause confusion among them.

“The DepEd must establish a clear-cut rule on the imposition of the no uniform policy. The acceptability of fashion or clothes the learners wear must be properly established,” TDC national president Benjo Basas said.

“Does it mean we would allow even the Jejemon fashion? The youth sub-culture of texting and even fashion which are discouraged by DepEd,” he added.

The DepEd has expressed concern that younger generations were having difficulty in spelling words, both in Filipino and English, because of the “jejemon-style” of texting, which has significantly altered the construction of words through text messages.

Basas, a secondary school teacher at the Baesa High School in Caloocan city, said the no uniform policy should not mean that school children can wear “jejemon” clothes such as baggy pants and loose T-shirts.

“The school is a training ground for the children’s good manner, proper conduct and discipline. Perhaps the policy might run contrary to this purpose,” he said.

According to Basas, the policy might even be detrimental to the safety and security of the school children in the urban areas. (PNA)

vcs/HCT

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