Commentary: A reflection on China enthusiasm at APEC meetings

November 15, 2009 5:39 pm 

By Tu Qi and Shi Xianzhen

SINGAPORE, Nov. 15 — As Chinese reporters covering this year's APEC meetings in Singapore, we find here another oft used language barring English, which is mandarin Chinese. True, there is a large population of Chinese descendants in Singapore, but this year's meeting also saw a continued rise of China on the world economic arena, and, naturally, learning to talk in Chinese becomes a fancy thing to do.

Not a single speech is delivered at the APEC CEO Summit without the mentioning of China, not a single business heavyweight turns a blind eye to China's rise and potentials. This enthusiasm for China is noticeable from statesmen, businessmen and academics alike when they reexamined the massive stimulus package put in place in China, when they talked about a swift and strong rebound in China, and when they contemplated China's role in the region as well as the world in the future.

When Chinese President Hu Jintao detailed to a galaxy of who's who about China's contribution to the world economic recovery since the culmination of the global economic crisis last year, very few doubted.

An economically vibrant China is a catalyst for growth in Asia, said Singapore President S. R. Nathan at a welcoming dinner for President Hu. A strong and prosperous China can be a source of strength for all nations, asserted U.S. President Barack Obama during his presidency's maiden trip to Asia.

Being the third largest economy in the world, a stronger China has taken its fair share for the world economic turnaround; but at the same time, we must also acknowledge the fact that China is still the biggest developing country, and the scale and the complexity of the problems China encounters during its development is hardly seen in the world.

This long march for prosperity in China can never be done out of a mere enthusiasm, but hard work and mutual trust. President Hu put forward a message to the world: China cannot achieve development in isolation from the world, and the world needs China for development. A more developed China will bring more opportunities and make a greater contribution to the world.

Enthusiasm can die out, but the expectations on and challenges for China will not, at least for quite a long time. (PNA/Xinhua)

DCT/rsm

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